Walls

Walls

My room does not have

four walls:

curving and caving,

I trace hollows over the paint,

bumping over the bodies

of insects brushed clean

in Victorian Pewter gray.

I have counted seven walls

in my room:

bumping and falling,

curving and caving

with the hollows

of bugs and the hollows

of whispers and the shadow

of one person in a bed

made for two.

A little bit about the author:

Emily Uduwana (she/her) is a poet and graduate student based in Southern California. Her most recent work has appeared in issues of Stone of Madness Press, Rogue Agent Journal, and perhappened mag.

Find more from Emily:

A Diary of Isolation

A little bit about the author:

Amy is a Master’s graduate in Social Anthropology at Edinburgh but has recently returned to her humble hometown in South London. She originally studied Archaeology but eventually decided to pursue a vocation that involved more time inside. Despite this, she still misses the dead things and pretending to be Indiana Jones. She is a writer and poet and is currently working as an editor for a publishing house. She has previously tried her hand working at museums, galleries and filmmaking. She loves to travel and generally finds herself in a youth hostel somewhere in the world at some point during the year. She has a blog in which she displays her poetry and writes articles about everything from the history of art therapy to tips to have a more sustainable period.

Find more from Amy:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Does this mean that I am a genius whose art will be appreciated much later?!

Trust me, in my eyes being an artist and living such a life is an art itself. To manage your time and emotions and to be ready to express yourself through art is often very personal. In fact, making a drawing, you put your heart and soul in it and you give your time and effort. Then your thoughts become visible to the audience and they start to evaluate, to criticise, to appreciate and eventually to love.Well, there are several types of people- some like to exhibit their art, others keep it to themselves until their friends find out their art and inspire the artist to exhibit his or her art. There is a third type of artists who love to do what they do but only a few people appreciate and give value to it. And the last type of artists are those who create some kind of work, but this is rather no one would really appreciate it.So the reason why I am saying all this is to explain that my artworks have been overvalued at my early childhood, later my art was appreciated and seen by my family, and today, in my consideration, the art that is done on a daily basis is situated somewhere between underappreciated and not appreciated at all.

Does this mean that I am a genius whose art will be appreciated much later?! This is hard to say, however I can tell you more about my passion and way of working…


Simple and minimalistic type of art. Usually attention is paid to every single line and when it the way I want it to be i just love it and show it. Well, there are times when a line turns more to the left instead of being straight… in those cases the disappointment is huge and some type of sadness appears inside of me. When a line is ugly there are two choices for me to make- take our the rubber, or throw away the sheet of paper and start to scratch! It varies according to the level of dissatisfaction. But, my style is such and my desire is to create simple and clean art without using rubber. I just feel like it. Furthermore, my teacher is the same type of artist- he rarely uses rubber.

So you can probably imagine how precise and careful my moves should be in order to achieve the desired lines with so much dedication and love. This is how it is done!

Art… It is interesting to do it, it is… it is hard to write about it especially when you have to go in details. As a matter of fact, I know from my teacher that too many different colors will destroy the beauty of an artwork. An artist should stick to several colors and as many shades as suitable. Imagine a warrior… ancient Greek warrior with brown eyes, short brown hair, beard, and a spear in his hands. Behind him is a horse and a lushy forest. Pine trees… Now, the less colors and the more shades of the colors you use, the better will be the final result. So my teacher told me.

Yes, depends on the perception that has to be created, the style of the artwork, more colors can be used. Pop-art for example is extremely colorful and vivid. Definitely not my type of art. However, in case that this is what a client wants to be created, well, the sky is the limit…

I know people who create a single A4 artwork for months. There are other artists who make the same size within minutes. So, what I want to tell you is this: There are rules in art, but there are no time limitations. There are professionalists who know the rules and follow them, there are also professionalists who know the rules and break them in order to make a point, to state an opinion, to express a vision. On the other hand, there are amateurs who do whatever just to get noticed. I have seen this and that and today, at the age of 29 all there is to say about my own art is: dedication, passion and love to every idea. When heart and soul are involved the result will be beautiful!

Not being afraid to voice my opinion

  • Name: Nicolle Knapová
  • Occupation: Poet/aspiring novelist
  • University Degree: Currently finishing up my master degree in Creative writing and publishing
  • Favourite artist: Halsey/ Taylor Swift
  • Favourite colour: Baby blue
  • Favourite sound: Rain

Hi MyBest, Zine! I am Nicolle and I am a poet and a writer from the Czech Republic. Being an artist to me means not being afraid to voice my opinion. Being an artist to me means being able to share stories with people around the world. It enables me to express my feelings which is really important to me.  I love writing about topics such as mental health problems, forbidden love and New York (particularly Brooklyn). One of the biggest things that influences and inspires me the most is music. It doesn’t matter if it is Chopin or The Paper Kites. The one artist that inspires me and influences my work the most is without doubt Halsey. We are both Libras and she is someone I truly look up to. I have been listening to her ever since she released her debut album Badlands. It was love at first sight. When it comes to literature, a big influence for me is Murakami. I devoured his book Afterdark in a couple of days and left me in awe. It really left a mark on me.  I love creating playlists on Spotify. I made one for my debut novel that I want to publish in the next two years. It works as a soundtrack and every time I listen to it I can imagine the story unravel in front of me. But sometimes a really beautiful photo can inspire me just as perfectly.  I am currently hard at work writing my debut poetry collection Aftermath which I want to publish late this year. It is a very personal collection of my teen and young adult life- relationships, family, friendships, unfulfilled expectations and my mental health struggles.

I don’t really have a specific work routine! All I can tell you is that my creativity really comes to life around 10 PM when I want to sleep but my brain just doesn’t want to hear it.  I did spend the whole summer writing my dissertation- three chapters of the above mentioned novel and it was quite intense to write every day. My inspiration really does come in flares. But my writing process always involves coffee and music. I just can’t imagine doing it without it. Oh, and a candle and preferably a rainy morning.

What made me want to be an artist goes back to elementary school when I started writing little snippets of stories. I didn’t have many talents back then but writing was always something that I was praised for and therefore it stuck with me. The very first proper story that I wrote was about two cats that traveled to Egypt only for the one of them to be mistaken for Nefertiti. It was such a fun thing to do and to think I was only 10! Back then I only wrote in Czech which changed when I started high school. I tried writing in Czech but to be honest it just doesn’t sound as natural anymore. I find it insane but it is what it is! I used to be bullied and writing was to me a great way to express how I felt and it was a way to escape the reality. I love being a storyteller and I really hope I will one day be able to do this as a full-time job.

Why rejections are important for an artist?

I remember the first time when I sent one of my short stories to a magazine. The excitement was mixed with anxiety. What if they don’t publish my work? Does it mean that I’m a bad writer? Does it mean that I should abandon my dreams of ever publishing anything and look for something else, choose a different path? My grandma always wanted me to become a doctor so maybe that’s what I should do? After a rather long internal monologue I clicked submit. Immediately after I closed my laptop and continued watching videos on my phone.

Then the day when I received an answer to my submission finally came. I got rejected. The story didn’t quite fit the magazine, they were looking for something else entirely. I didn’t understand. I have put so much work into this piece, the thought of it not being good enough to be published was very disappointing. I kept on reading. They said they liked my story, however, even though it was a well written piece it didn’t give the reader the feel they were looking for for the issue. A part of me wanted to stop reading the email – what’s the point in reading it if it’s a simple no from the editing team? Let me tell you!

Every rejection is an opportunity to further improve your work. If a publication says they won’t include your work in their next issue there is always a reason behind it and usually they will tell you why it’s not the best fit for their publication. Rejection is not the end of the world, it’s a suggestion on how to improve and perhaps what to do next time to get that publication! It’s always fairly disappointing when our work gets rejected but hey, do you know how many times Stephen King got rejection letter before he got published? Exactly! It’s not a sign that you are bad at what you’re doing, it’s a sign you still have a room for improvement or that you simply didn’t read the submission guidelines careful enough and your work doesn’t fit the theme of the issue.

What are my tips? Easy:

  1. Always read the guidelines very carefully – they tell you what size/font to use, what genres they accept and what else you need to include in your submission.
  2. Don’t beg to be published – let your work speak for itself.
  3. Never send unfinished work or first drafts – take some time and put effort into the piece you want to get published. It does pay off.
  4. Don’t get discouraged, rejection is nothing else but an invitation to try again.
  5. Keep on trying till you succeed – I have received multiple rejection emails and then one sunny day I got an email from Vice inviting me to write for them! Whatever you do – never give up.
  6. Observe publications you like, read what they publish, see what they are all about and only then submit your work. If you don’t know a publication, how can you be sure what you send is the right material for them?
  7. Keep on creating!

I hope I helped you a bit and made you realize that rejections are only part of creation. Keep on creating! – Monyca