www.WhenweGoOnline.com

Hello all,

Hope you are well and still keeping positive within Lockdown 3.0.

Today, I’m going to do something a little different and just write this letter to you all, about how I’m doing in this time and hopefully reach out to all of you who may be feeling similar.

When I say, I’m a drama student- most people would think of someone who lives their life on a stage, pratice rooms full of people making weird shapes and pretending to be trees (which I have done but don’t judge it). Though now, in this time that feels more like a fantasy than something I was doing only 3 months again, which I luckily was able to do.

Working with a mask on, is not the most glamorous thing in the world but it was not the torture that it appears to be. I was able to work in a class of 7 people, all socially distanced and in masks, but still in a pratice room. It was a strange experience, a warped sense of a familiar feeling of going into the room. Nevertheless, I was excited to do things after the nervousness we felt in Lockdown 2 of not knowing if life can be a little bit normal again. However, I also felt fear and frustration- fear that, I was doing my degree, all the while I kept seeing on  the news how the industry, I wanted to go into was ‘crumbling’ and going to be ‘CLOSED FOREVER!’ – Oh, the horror of it all! But it scared me of the anxieties what if it did, then what would I do, nevertheless, I just kept going to my classes and tried to solider through the fear that this wouldn’t be so.

And frustrated, I was upset that it just didn’t feel the same, it didn’t feel like the same degree and my experiences would they amount to the same, if I can’t properly perform.  This whole thing was just a whirlwind of emotions for three months and put me into a strange place.

Now in Lockdown 3, I miss that feeling but I also learnt from it. Now all my class I am sad to saying are online, which is still a strange sensation. Nevertheless those 3 months taught me a lot in how to cope in this strange circumstance. But I’ll break it down to three things.

1, Don’t be afraid to take time for yourself – Sometimes anxiety can take over in a difficult situation, it’s okay to take a day to yourself, to ease your worries and working on yourself, not me that’s writing and recently…knitting! I definitely recommend it- I’m not the best knitter but it’s very relaxing. Admit to yourself you’re having a bad day. We all have them.

2. Get to know other online chat avenues- Zoom is not the only outlet out there. Yes, it maybe it’s the most efficient but also take time away from it to, there is Microsoft teams, Skype, A website called Lark which not only calendars your events but also taking calls. There are plenty of avenues to try to navigate and feel more comfortable in this new way of talking. Additionally, this can apply talking to your friends, this doesn’t have to be over zoom either! There are plenty of ways to reach out, whether be over the internet through discord which is perfect for voice chats in big groups or even writing a letter or going on a walk, a nice way to break your day away from a screen  and stress and reach out to the people you love.

3. Think about what you’re grateful for. Over Lockdown, I feel I’ve reflected on I am lucky to have people around me who care about me so much and have been making steps to learn to appreciate things in life more . So tonight, I will be thankful I’m able to make a pancake and enjoy it with my family, in my home where I’m warm, fed and loved and I hope you all can do the same, whether it be with friends, family, pets or even having some alone time. Remember you can do this; you’ve survived this long and it’ll get more comfortable.

Love Em x

Em’s tip: If there are any societies or groups whether you be in university or just online in general. Don’t be afraid to get involved, it’s a great way to meet new people and have fun things to do online. For example, in my drama society at my university, we just did a online combat class- How cool is that!

A picture of my Knitting! I know it’s got some holes but a rainbow is a rainbow none the less.

From School to University – The changes and differences to be aware of.

In my lead up to leaving my secondary school (which also acted as my college) to University, I found the transition difficult, particularly in the differences in structure. I know that for many young people, whether going to university or not, it’s a hard experience to go into the unknown. As a person with some experience now, I hope to put your mind at ease, even if not completely, but just a little, during this transition, particularly in this time where nothing really feels right

The Workload can vary 

For people coming out of A-levels, it was a time of having an extreme revision of a lot of content for exams. This may be something you never want to do again because of this. University is similar but not the stereotype of being A levels on high energy. Instead, most of your First-year work will be things you may have covered already and then build-up to the new elements. Lectures are similar to classes with the typical PowerPoint and taking notes, however, there are also seminars later on that are much more suited for you, instead of waiting behind to ask your teacher a question about your work after class. Instead, you have an hour with other people in your course to, not only ask questions but also get other perspectives that may change your mind. In many courses, you don’t have to go in every day, similar to college, but this time is not just to do homework but also do research on your own. In my opinion, University is a perfect space for people who don’t mind doing some extra work. As you work through your modules, it may appear that because you study one thing (or two if doing a joint degree) that you do less, but like college, you will have more substantial work instead to build your understanding. 

  • Teaching

In my experience, self-study was always the main focus at University. The majority of my teachers are good at what they do because they don’t need to specify that they are knowledgable. You already know that they are (partially because half of the books you will read are written by them) but also because they trust you enough that you can answer your own questions and solve your own problems instead of relying on the teacher. This can be one of the hardest things to adjust to, but the way to get over this is through doing your own research. If you simply rely on what your lecturer tells you throughout your degree, you will not get the full experience. Instead, you should gain more experiences. A good way to do this is not just to talk to your lecturers but perhaps reach out to other lecturers in different modules too to gain their view in order to eventually come to your own.

For this reason, most of the best teachers in my university experience acted more like hype-men and give advice rather than lead us to conclusions for the entire time. This transition is hard to get around but it is important for students when going into careers. Just make sure you still ask as many questions as possible.

  • Freedom and looking after yourself

For many people, going to University means freedom you don’t experience being surrounded by your family. It’s almost like a temptation once you get there, your focus is on making friends, making memories and going clubbing because now you can. However, these wants also distract you from the more negative elements of becoming an adult which you may not need to think of in school. One of the examples may be feeding yourself and being away from home. For some, this isn’t a problem but being in a new atmosphere and environment distracts from learning. In college, there is an intensity which people again want to avoid and University, for the most part, can do that, however, this will only happen if you plan. It is important to find in your first year, while things are little more relaxed, a balance between work and social life, such as doing 4 hours of revision a day on the lead up to exams or going out at least for 2 hours a day to see a friend. The main thing is to build a plan that can be challenging at times but also allows there to be some pacing. 

Once you have that, the university may become easier and less pressing on you and your mental health, which is the most important thing to look after.

Uni is a strange experience, to say the least between the so-called real world and childhood but this makes it the time in which you can start to figure out who you are, what you want and start to build it. In this time, it may be hard to know that but uni will continue differently through zoom and if they can continue so can you.

Em x

Em’s tip- It’s okay not to understand who you are as an artist, explore and try new things and don’t feel you need to stick to one thing to be popular, versatility is a good trait to have and being able to adapt is even better.

Also, take your vitamins.

Empty Space by Kristóf Szabó

(1)empty space New Delhi, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Raki Nikahetiya
(2)empty space Moscow, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Vladimir Stepanchenko
(3)empty space Sao Paulo, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Elena Kilina

About the work:

The pandemic resulted in the vacancy of previously busy spaces. A kind of error occurred in life, the tragedy of this social situation resulted in putting globalization on hold, while carbon-dioxide emission has dropped drastically. Empty spaces are witnessing our overworked, energy-wasting lives, prompting us to finally change our way of life globally, otherwise situations like this might resurface in the future.
KristofLab, has collected photos empty cities such as Madrid, which was developed into creating a first piece of the series. Subsequently, he received photos from many parts of the world from volunteers for the project. These artists helped to continue the series with their contributions. Kristóf hopes that this project symbolizes well how artistic imagination can help us thrive as human beings in difficult times and the work serves as a definition of our common values across boundaries and to once again remind us that we have never been and will never really be isolated.

Contributors: Kiszner Édua, Antal István, Marcin Idźkowski, Angela Galvan, Gasquk, Kristijonas Dirse, Peter Korcek, Erhan US, Ciro Di Fiore, Elena Kilina, Sangeeth Aiyappa, Vladimir Stepanchenko, Raki Nikahetiya, David Leshem, Haccoun Myriam 

(1)empty space Madrid, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Kiszner Édua
(2)empty space Vienna, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Antla István

A little bit about the artist:

Kristóf Szabó was born in 1988 in Hungary. Since 2016 he has been consciously using the term KristofLab as a kind of brand referring to interdisciplinarity and his media art activities. He often works in a team or creates collaborations with other artists, often crossing boundaries between art genres. He graduated from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts (2012). In 2011 he studied with an Erasmus scholarship in Dresden. He is a member of the Ziggurat Project focusing on various co-art collaborations, regularly working with them mainly on site-specific performances across V4 countries and Norway.

(1)empty space Budapest, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Angela Galvan
(3)empty space Naples, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Ciro Di Fiore

Find more from Kristóf Szabó:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Untried realities by Zula

About the work:

Untried Realities is about a personal experience of social separation during Covid-19 in East London. Through self-portraiture, I bear the feelings of solitude, craving for human contact, and need for nature. I live in an urban and concrete part of London, without any outdoor space and I started this series on the day of Boris Johnson’s self-isolation announcement in response to the situation. I use mundane household scenes to create a new “reality,” one which is physically in my flat, but one which hopefully visually transports the viewer into a parallel world. I make use of shadows and light to create humorous moments and temporary escapism from my current situation and to facilitate a sense of detachment.

A little bit about the artist:

Zula Rabikowska is Polish-British photographer based in London. Zula was born in Poland, grew up in the UK and worked in France, China, South Africa, India, Palestine and the Caribbean. Her practice is influenced by her own experience of immigration and in her work she explores the themes of national identity, displacement and belonging. Zula often works with digital and analogue photography, and incorporates archival images and documents to challenge conventional visual story-telling norms. Zula has obtained an MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography from London College of Communication. Zula also works as a freelance photographer and as a photojournalist for SOPA Images in Hong Kong.

Find more from Zula:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

The idea of time

During this hectic and unsure times I’ve started to reflect on the time, as a concept. As you may know I often refer to the idea of time,  evanescence and fleeting in my creations so this subject is particularly close to my heart.

The first  thing which came to my mind (besides Salvador Dali’s “Persistence of Memory” of course) was that the most important events in our lives happen in a matter of a few hours. I’m completely amazed by this discovery. Let’s see: people cheat, get engaged, break up, say “yes” at the altar, kill a man, eat breakfast, come up with a revolutionary idea and it’s all a matter of such a short period of time. How surprising is that. We often think of the events in terms of motives and outcomes. But we rarely think of how much time takes making the actual decision, taking the action. Some of the most important things take just a few seconds. Most of the revolutionary masterpieces were visualised in a very short period of time.

“Greenwich” installation  

The reason I say this is because I constantly get the idea that I’m somehow late. Late with the deadline, late when it comes to painting. I get the feeling that I haven’t done enough. I’m 22 and there are so many people who have achieved so much more than I have so I’ve got to be late with that too, right? I believe many of us get these thoughts at some point. Afterall we live in a world where there is a lot of competition. The world races fast and so does the art. Pictures became a way to commemorate fleeting reality. But do we have the time to look through them? Or are they just somewhere on our smartphones and occasionally on the platforms such as Instagram. Did the art of photography become a reflex action which anyone can master  without even caring? Is our creativity constantly put in frames that we create by comparing ourselves to the others and by rushing somewhere? But where exactly? And so I’d like to encourage you (and myself) to consider something. Since the most important events happen in a blink of an eye is there such a big reason to get stressed out and constantly be on the run? It also applies to creating new art pieces. Because there comes a point when the expectations grow so high that there is a possibility of falling into pattern without noticing it. As one of my professors said ‘sometimes you have to take a few steps back and reflect to go forward’.

 Margaret Atwood once wrote: ‘Time is not a thing that passes… it’s a sea on which you float.’

Let’s keep floating.

Welcome to the art student’s world!

“Street Bird” Maria Krupa 100×150 2018

In high school my art history teacher gave me one advice that totally changed my mindset. She said: “Kid, if you want to get somewhere, get involved in the projects, voluntary work and internships during your college days”. I really took this advice to my heart. One might wonder : Why is it so crucial to do additional art related projects? Won’t it be enough if I just get my degree? Well, no, not really. Don’t get me wrong guys, I don’t encourage you to have no life and overwork yourself. As many things in life it’s all about balance. The most important thing that these collaborations give you is a contact network. One thing I learned through these amazing three years of my art education is that art creations need audience. What would happen if we would never be able to see Millais’s “Ophelia” or “Portrait of Madame Matisse” by Henri Matisse? The thing that these two artist (and many other) have in common is the fact that they were members or artistic groups.

You see here what I’m trying to say? You just never know who will pass on the good word about you or if this exhibition won’t be the one on which your painting will be admired or sold to a buyer- a friend of the person who organised the event. This story happened to me. I was on plain-air with my friends, we were hanging out by the lake, painting. The weather was beautiful so I decided to put my painting outside so that it could dry. Then the strangest thing happened. A lady that had a house nearby got completely mesmerised by my (my!) painting and she decided to buy it. You see, I’m writing here about many “firsts” today. It’s because your actions, the initiative that you take, your first email to someone might be just what you need to fulfill your dream about being a full time artist.

Here I give you the top three places to look for art opportunities:

  1. Instagram and Facebook. Almost everyone of us has an account on these websites. Follow many artists, galleries, events. Take initiative, dm someone and ask if maybe they’d like to do some collaboration. Put yourself out there!
  2. Open Call sites. There are so many of them! Take the chance, send your works. Just remember about few things. It’s better to take five titles, write deadlines in your calendar and give it a shot. Don’t take too many. Doing works by the given subject might put you off track of your own creations. Pay attention to participation fees (if there are some) and read all terms carefully.
  3. Your local galleries, coffee shops, newspapers. Don’t be afraid to ask! Face to face contact is very important. Maybe someone needs a new logo for their place? Or possibly some newspaper is looking for illustrations? Always carry your portfolio with you on your smartphone. You never know when it will come in handy!

Let’s not lose these chances, let’s say the word “yes” more often to the opportunities we come across.

Stay tuned, stay healthy, stay inspired.

Maria

How did I get here?

Cover
SHOT FROM MY SECOND YEAR FILM, WHICH I MADE BASED OF MONYCA’S POEM (HEY THERE)

I remember my last year in Art High School, and how much I wanted to leave, to go somewhere and “start my life”. I came to England (Farnham to be precise) – to study. I chose an animation course at UCA (University for the Creative Arts) and I was proud of myself, of getting so far.

I was also very anxious… Like many many students from abroad (I can only speak for my fellow EU students as I only know what it feels like from that perspective) I was struggling to find myself in the new reality. How do I get the job, insurance number, flat? Why is everything so expensive why everyone was so hostile to students?

MY GRADUATION WORKS FROM HIGH SCHOOL

My first semester was rather difficult. I was living two towns away from the university and I was casually late for my classes almost everyday. I spent my whole weekends at work, in a small Polish coffee shop which was run by suspicious and a bit odd middle aged man, who called me naughty Agata and Monyca – mean monkey Monyca.
The classes were interesting, but I felt like there was not enough of them to be honest. I did have a lot of work to do, especially considering that I had a part time job as well and spent a lot of time commuting to and from university but I managed to pass to the next year with not so bad grades. I spend my free time meeting new friends and trying to improve my art and English.

SHOT FROM MY FIRST YEAR FILM

I think the second year is worth skipping, because no one really remembers it. It’s sort of like a transition period. However, back then I started to read more about art history, doing first parts of the research for my dissertation and planning my last year film. I feel like the second year is the time of discovering what we are really interested in, to establish who our friends are and making small projects before the stress of third year creeps in.

ANOTHER SHOT FROM THE SECOND YEAR FILM

At first I though I had everything under control. My dissertation was planned, I spent all summer preparing everything I could for my third year film, sketching, reading and resting. But that was a trap. It starts quiet, but then before you realize you wake up at 6am everyday, work in the library till your classes start, then go to work, and after your day job work on your project more because you are always behind on your schedule. It was stressful, but we’ve all managed to finish in time. The dissertation was done, and I was proud of it, especially that I found the topic that I’m really into now – surrealism and uncanny art.

I think it did put me on the right path in a way, after I’ve graduated (with a first, yay!) I’ve got to throw my hat, finish my film, talk with my friends about where the are heading and get to rest a bit before the next steps.

SOME OF THE STORYBOARDS FROM MY LAST FILM

After that I got lost for a bit. I focused on saving up and resting. I’ve focused on finding who I am as an artist (and I’m still very much looking), I’ve been painting, sawing, visiting galleries across England and going for small trips to find inspirations. I’ve got an internship for a bit and applied for entry level jobs. I’ve decided to continue studying and applied for Masters.

Overall, I think it was a good experience. I did grow a lot as a person and artist and I’m happy to start the new adventure – hopefully after this pandemic passes.

🌻🌻🌻Stay home and be safe 🌻🌻🌻 – Agata