Solitude in visuals by Jess Mezo

Life’s strange: “Love has a way of surviving in small spaces, pockets of reality, remembrance, earmarks and notes left on the margins of some old diary of ours. Echoes of midnight conversations and summers past find us in contemplation, even though their sharp edges mellow out and blur into watercolours over time. It’s everywhere. You’ll find it within the slow rhythm of the urban heartbeat, or the stanzas of love poems exchanged between French symbolist visionaries Paul Verlaine and Arthur Rimbaud.”
A Shakespearean sonnet: “‘It’s you!’ ‘No, it’s you!’ – it’s always someone else. Maybe it’s a form of recognition, maybe it’s the forces of alienation and the pressures of our capitalist economy. Maybe it’s both. Fact, fiction, past, and present melt into one as we inhabit the same virtual spaces, running through the same loops, playing out the same patterns of behaviour in eerily similar settings. What lies beyond our conditioning? Some things cannot be intellectualised, only experienced.”
Community: “It often feels like the clock stopped ticking months ago. ‘Life as it is’, life as we remember it, ground to a halt, allowing a strange sense of stillness to filter in. Objects are left behind, spaces are abandoned as the rhythm or normalcy skips a beat. It’s been summer for months – it’s been a different year all along, or at least it feels like it. Temporality gets muddied as our perception of time is thrown around by winds of a new decade.” 

A little bit about the author:

Jess Mezo is a thinker, writer, experimental artist, and semi-professional picture-snapper, focusing mostly on political aesthetics, structures of power, resistance, beauty, and the psychology of everyday life in her research, writing, and art. Having seized every opportunity to travel and study abroad while earning her parallel BA degrees, she finally settled down in the UK and completed her MSc in International Relations at the University of Bristol. Jess is currently working as a freelancer and preparing for further studies after a year-long travel break she spent expanding her creative and professional toolkit.

Jess has recently launched her passion project, JessThetics, across different social media platforms to host her social and political commentary, as well as her (visual) essays on aesthetics and modern philosophy. A passionate student of photography and digital art, Jess pairs her articles with pictures and other forms of mixed media shot or otherwise created by her, often solely for a particular piece of written work. She invites everyone to join her on a journey into the realm of the unconscious, experimental, and accidental, as she embarks on a quest to uncover more about the delicate balance that exists between truth in beauty and beauty in truth.

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Isolation

A little bit about the artist:

Isabel is a Spanish illustrator and graphic designer living in Southern Spain, her pronouns are she/her. 
As every other illustrator out there, she never stopped drawing, so studying arts was the right call, after specializing in printmaking she moved to illustration gradually.  Most of her illustrations are really colorful and cartoonish, recently she realized that her characters always have big hairy legs and dark circles.  

Find more from Isabel:

Dwelling for a moment of solitude with Lebasille

About the work:

As an artist, I dwell for a moment of solitude, it is essential to our well-being and crucial for our soul.
To be independent and still in the moment. To accept your own presence and above all, your being. To reflect and turn within.
It is the foundation of exploratory, for a brief instant or a continuous period, until it gets comfortable and you get mentally stronger.
The word solitude comes from the Latin word “solitudinem”, which means “loneliness”. On the contrary, ihey are two different things. Loneliness is marked by a sense of isolation, while solitude is the state of being online without being lonely.

I will always crave for solitude.

UNTITLED, 2019
A conversation between current affairs and different communities and the road to improvement.
ROUNDUP, 2018
“Oh, to live on Sugar Mountain, With the barkers and the colored balloons” (Neil Young)

A little bit about the artist:

Lebasille ° 1989, Belgium

Lebasille – a pseudonym of Isabelle – is a visual artist born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1989.
She makes original collages on paper, with images from magazines, books and other imagery sources from 1920 up to the present. She has always dedicated herself to analog collage, however, she has expanded her praxis to digital works, offering endless possibilities.
Within her analogue and digital work, she plays with proportions, dialectic and context. A conversation occurs between current events and ideals – a social reality with an extra dimension of meaning or a layer of surrealism.
She rediscovers the past creating a vintage future. The transformation of each individual image gives the viewer and his eye the opportunity to reinterpret elements or new ready-made images.
With a growing love for imagery of different worlds, eras and ideals, she started to cut out and assemble countless images. It became part of her daily routine.
Since 2018, she is attending two different courses in the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp.
Many exhibitions followed, of which the most memorable was in a museum in The Netherlands about food in art in past and present. Her practice consists of creating imagery for album covers, magazine covers, book illustrations, postcard illustrations and more.

Find more from Lebasille:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/