Debris from the past by Amy-Leigh Bird

About the work:

I studied Painting & Printmaking at The Glasgow School of Art and recently graduated from my MA in Creative Entrepreneurship from UEA. Since moving to London I have been making work which explores the ideas of time and place. Walking along the Thames I have been collecting objects and finding ways to use them in my work. From the debris of the past I have been particularly drawn to the many old bones that are found along the foreshore, and I have been finding ways to incorporate them into my practice. I have also been seeking ways of making new work under lockdown by repurposing and up-cycling old work and using the resources I have to hand. Coming from a working-class background has meant that the work I create has usually come from using the scarce resources and material available to me. I have experimented a lot with natural materials in my work, recently creating a sculpture of found bones, Thames clay and scraps of old wood found on my street. Earlier on in my practice I made a curiosity cabinet of found items from the river Kelvin in Glasgow which was later used as my degree show piece. I have always been attracted to the unwanted, discarded material that I find around me, finding ways to repurpose it and bring it a new life.

A little bit about the author:

Amy-Leigh Bird graduated from the Painting & Printmaking BA Hons at The Glasgow School of Art in 2017 and in 2019 graduated from her MA in Creative Entrepreneurship at The University of East Anglia.  Whilst studying Amy-Leigh lived and studied in Jerusalem, Israel at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and has taken part in several group and solo exhibitions including her first solo show at The Anise Gallery, Shad Thames, The Other Art Fair and at The West End Centre. After her graduation she was selected for Aon’s ‘Community Artist Award 2017’ and awarded the ‘Artist in Italy Residency 2018’ where she spent ten luxurious days walking about the Tuscan landscape collecting inspirational material. Since graduating the award-winning artist has exhibited alongside Christian Boltanski at the Apple and the Lust Gallery in Edinburgh, at The Edinburgh Art Fair and at An Lanntair in Stornoway after taking part in a two-week sailing residency with Sail Britain. This year she will be exhibiting at the prestigious and highly regarded No20 Arts gallery in Highbury and Islington and developing her research on the bones found on the Thames foreshore. She is currently living and working in London, developing her research on the psychology of collecting and the emotional significance of objects and place.

Find more from Amy-Leigh Bird:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Solitude in visuals by Jess Mezo

Life’s strange: “Love has a way of surviving in small spaces, pockets of reality, remembrance, earmarks and notes left on the margins of some old diary of ours. Echoes of midnight conversations and summers past find us in contemplation, even though their sharp edges mellow out and blur into watercolours over time. It’s everywhere. You’ll find it within the slow rhythm of the urban heartbeat, or the stanzas of love poems exchanged between French symbolist visionaries Paul Verlaine and Arthur Rimbaud.”
A Shakespearean sonnet: “‘It’s you!’ ‘No, it’s you!’ – it’s always someone else. Maybe it’s a form of recognition, maybe it’s the forces of alienation and the pressures of our capitalist economy. Maybe it’s both. Fact, fiction, past, and present melt into one as we inhabit the same virtual spaces, running through the same loops, playing out the same patterns of behaviour in eerily similar settings. What lies beyond our conditioning? Some things cannot be intellectualised, only experienced.”
Community: “It often feels like the clock stopped ticking months ago. ‘Life as it is’, life as we remember it, ground to a halt, allowing a strange sense of stillness to filter in. Objects are left behind, spaces are abandoned as the rhythm or normalcy skips a beat. It’s been summer for months – it’s been a different year all along, or at least it feels like it. Temporality gets muddied as our perception of time is thrown around by winds of a new decade.” 

A little bit about the author:

Jess Mezo is a thinker, writer, experimental artist, and semi-professional picture-snapper, focusing mostly on political aesthetics, structures of power, resistance, beauty, and the psychology of everyday life in her research, writing, and art. Having seized every opportunity to travel and study abroad while earning her parallel BA degrees, she finally settled down in the UK and completed her MSc in International Relations at the University of Bristol. Jess is currently working as a freelancer and preparing for further studies after a year-long travel break she spent expanding her creative and professional toolkit.

Jess has recently launched her passion project, JessThetics, across different social media platforms to host her social and political commentary, as well as her (visual) essays on aesthetics and modern philosophy. A passionate student of photography and digital art, Jess pairs her articles with pictures and other forms of mixed media shot or otherwise created by her, often solely for a particular piece of written work. She invites everyone to join her on a journey into the realm of the unconscious, experimental, and accidental, as she embarks on a quest to uncover more about the delicate balance that exists between truth in beauty and beauty in truth.

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Empty Space by Kristóf Szabó

(1)empty space New Delhi, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Raki Nikahetiya
(2)empty space Moscow, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Vladimir Stepanchenko
(3)empty space Sao Paulo, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Elena Kilina

About the work:

The pandemic resulted in the vacancy of previously busy spaces. A kind of error occurred in life, the tragedy of this social situation resulted in putting globalization on hold, while carbon-dioxide emission has dropped drastically. Empty spaces are witnessing our overworked, energy-wasting lives, prompting us to finally change our way of life globally, otherwise situations like this might resurface in the future.
KristofLab, has collected photos empty cities such as Madrid, which was developed into creating a first piece of the series. Subsequently, he received photos from many parts of the world from volunteers for the project. These artists helped to continue the series with their contributions. Kristóf hopes that this project symbolizes well how artistic imagination can help us thrive as human beings in difficult times and the work serves as a definition of our common values across boundaries and to once again remind us that we have never been and will never really be isolated.

Contributors: Kiszner Édua, Antal István, Marcin Idźkowski, Angela Galvan, Gasquk, Kristijonas Dirse, Peter Korcek, Erhan US, Ciro Di Fiore, Elena Kilina, Sangeeth Aiyappa, Vladimir Stepanchenko, Raki Nikahetiya, David Leshem, Haccoun Myriam 

(1)empty space Madrid, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Kiszner Édua
(2)empty space Vienna, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Antla István

A little bit about the artist:

Kristóf Szabó was born in 1988 in Hungary. Since 2016 he has been consciously using the term KristofLab as a kind of brand referring to interdisciplinarity and his media art activities. He often works in a team or creates collaborations with other artists, often crossing boundaries between art genres. He graduated from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts (2012). In 2011 he studied with an Erasmus scholarship in Dresden. He is a member of the Ziggurat Project focusing on various co-art collaborations, regularly working with them mainly on site-specific performances across V4 countries and Norway.

(1)empty space Budapest, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Angela Galvan
(3)empty space Naples, 2020, c-print, 50×50 cm, Szabó Kristóf – KristofLab & Ciro Di Fiore

Find more from Kristóf Szabó:

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Cosmic Cat by Esme Lee

About the work:

My piece is called ‘Cosmic Cat’, a fantasy illustration featuring a cat alone in her own cosmos. It was digitally created in Adobe Fresco. I created this piece in response to the isolation and solitude I have been experiencing as a result of being in the High Risk category during the pandemic and therefore spending time at home in isolation.  I imagined my home as my own personal galaxy or universe, and pictured myself as the cat because while cats are solitary, often antisocial in fact, they are also strong, resilient and self-sufficient, this helped me to focus on the positives of my situation and to remind myself that I am a survivor, like the cat.

A little bit about the artist:

Esme Lee is an emerging artist and illustrator who also happens to be disabled, and the carer of two disabled children. As such her work expresses, in turn, sadness and isolation, childlike playfulness, and exuberant joy. With a distinctive style and keen eye for colour, Esme combines digital artwork with her background in traditional art, to create digital pieces with a truly authentic feel. Esme hopes in the long term to become a champion and advocate for disabled, female, and minority artists.

Fine more from Esme:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Isolation

A little bit about the artist:

Isabel is a Spanish illustrator and graphic designer living in Southern Spain, her pronouns are she/her. 
As every other illustrator out there, she never stopped drawing, so studying arts was the right call, after specializing in printmaking she moved to illustration gradually.  Most of her illustrations are really colorful and cartoonish, recently she realized that her characters always have big hairy legs and dark circles.  

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Dwelling for a moment of solitude with Lebasille

About the work:

As an artist, I dwell for a moment of solitude, it is essential to our well-being and crucial for our soul.
To be independent and still in the moment. To accept your own presence and above all, your being. To reflect and turn within.
It is the foundation of exploratory, for a brief instant or a continuous period, until it gets comfortable and you get mentally stronger.
The word solitude comes from the Latin word “solitudinem”, which means “loneliness”. On the contrary, ihey are two different things. Loneliness is marked by a sense of isolation, while solitude is the state of being online without being lonely.

I will always crave for solitude.

UNTITLED, 2019
A conversation between current affairs and different communities and the road to improvement.
ROUNDUP, 2018
“Oh, to live on Sugar Mountain, With the barkers and the colored balloons” (Neil Young)

A little bit about the artist:

Lebasille ° 1989, Belgium

Lebasille – a pseudonym of Isabelle – is a visual artist born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1989.
She makes original collages on paper, with images from magazines, books and other imagery sources from 1920 up to the present. She has always dedicated herself to analog collage, however, she has expanded her praxis to digital works, offering endless possibilities.
Within her analogue and digital work, she plays with proportions, dialectic and context. A conversation occurs between current events and ideals – a social reality with an extra dimension of meaning or a layer of surrealism.
She rediscovers the past creating a vintage future. The transformation of each individual image gives the viewer and his eye the opportunity to reinterpret elements or new ready-made images.
With a growing love for imagery of different worlds, eras and ideals, she started to cut out and assemble countless images. It became part of her daily routine.
Since 2018, she is attending two different courses in the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp.
Many exhibitions followed, of which the most memorable was in a museum in The Netherlands about food in art in past and present. Her practice consists of creating imagery for album covers, magazine covers, book illustrations, postcard illustrations and more.

Find more from Lebasille:

https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Facing Empty Lines

About the work:

Defined as the removal of information from a text before it is printed or made public, redaction can also be applied to forms and images. The Lino print Facing Empty Lines expresses the empty spaces in between what we see every day. The emptiness in our age lines, our expressions, thoughts and movements. I explore the spaces that have been forgotten, by removing sensitive information from the forms of three faces. These sensitivities are an individuals radical thoughts, removed. They are negative expressions removed. In relation to George Orwell’s Doublespeak, this work shows the deliberate distortion of the words that leave our mouths, with the hope of self preservation in an increasingly online globalised society.

In every interaction, we are actors on a stage, often hiding our true thoughts and being. I attempt to remove these masks and delve deeper into our truths. With my lines, I trace the journey of a thought, born a truth only to become a redacted voice. I cut away to reveal these empty spaces in between. The question remains, what is left when these elements are removed?

A little bit about the artist:

Mia de Las Casas is a textile designer based between London and Ireland. Focused on print design, for fashion and interiors, she has also exhibited textile installations and Lino prints. Having recently graduated from Chelsea College of Arts, London, she is working as a freelance designer and artist. She has worked in fashion couture houses and artist’s studios.
Her concepts range from personal to global themes. These include the exploration of tragic emotions, commenting on human interactions, and exploring the overlapping of science and nature. Her work has a basis in nature, borrowing natural forms and making them her own. Moreover, using sustainable materials is very important to Mia’s work. As an ecoresolution, she has resolved to not use synthetic materials.

The idea of Solitude

Alfred Ramsden, 20 , is an aspiring artist from Medway, Kent.

He does a wide variety of works in photography, graphic design and fine art. Alfred Attended the Howard school in Rainham and studied fine art there until he graduated to 6th Form at the school and began to study Graphics design and Photography until the age of 18. Alfred left school however continued to work on developing his art portfolio which contains all of his worlds from during and after his time in education. Alfred’s Art contains a wide variety of influences and ideas mainly conveyed and found through his love of music. 

The art piece submitted by Alfred does not have a title, the first ideas Alfred had about the theme of ‘solitude’ all conveyed very dark dingy images.

However, after researching Alfred found that solitude does not always convey an image of isolation and loneliness.

The first ideas that Alfred had were the ideas of empty Mediterranean swimming pools. The image submitted was heavily influenced primarily by the work of a London born artist called Johnny pockets, the image submitted was created by Alfred, he created the image by painting it on a canvas using acrylic paints. He then scanned the image on a printer and re-worked and edited it digitally on photoshop where he improved the colour, brightness.