Happy New Year!

2020 was certainly not the best year so far, however, we are all done with it now! Even though nobody suspected it might take such an awful turn and the whole world will be hiding away from the pandemic if we think about it it might have not been as bad as it seems. Sit down, take a moment and think about positive aspects of 2020. Here are some of the positives from us!

  1. Because of lockdown we had more time to develop what was before merely just an idea of MyBest, and it the middle of 2020 we were ready to launch the website and publish the very first issue!
  2. MyBest, became more than we thought it would! We were hoping for MyBest, to be a quarterly online magazine but now we are posting every single week and even though it does get a bit much (keep in mind that at the moment, there is just one person taking care of all of the social media, scheduling, editing and all that jazz!) we hope that MyBest, will keep on going forward and we will be able to grow even more in 2021.
  3. We managed to work on many side projects – working with other artists is a full time job as it leads to many side projects and interesting collaborations. We are incredibly thankful for every single person we got to work with as a result of our work on MyBest,

2020 was a year of stagnation and yet many things have started rolling on quicker than ever. We might’ve not been able to do everything we have planned for 2020 but in the age of the pandemic the year actually had some bright moments. Only think about the amount of free time you could use to just rest, work on your projects, do uni work, watch your favorite movies and TV series. Sometimes it’s not that bad to stop for a second. The past year has definitely taught us to be grateful for everything we have and always strive to better ourselves as people.

We wish you all the best for the year 2021 and we hope that this year will bring nothing but joy to you and people close to you.

MyBest,

Monyca.

Motivate yourself!

Working at your own pace can prove to be quite difficult sometimes. When it comes to my creative endeavors I am my own boss, which means no deadlines, no briefs, no actual boss. I am naturally a very self-motivated person and I find myself doing multiple things at the same time. Thanks to the flexibility of my day job I can easily maneuver between doing my master’s degree, various courses (now it’s mental health, hr and pr courses) and planning to open yet another business – for now there are only plans and even more courses! But how do you stay motivated in the world filled with day jobs leaving you little to no time to relax and have a breather? Let me give you some tips!

  1. Working on a project doesn’t always mean getting stuff done – make a list of things that you need to get done in order to be able to sit down and start actually working. It may be something like getting more pencils and paper from your local shop or drafting a plan of dealing with everything. Get a scrapbook and make your mind map for the project, it makes it easier to keep on top of things!
  2. Every little bit helps – if you find yourself stuck at some point look for inspiration in different places. My current go to are online forums with fellow creators. My favourite one at the moment is the Dots. It’s a platform for creatives run by an amazing creative Pip Jamieson. You can ask the creative community questions, read posts and project plans by other creatives and simply get engaged!
  3. Webinars – in the age of global pandemic there are more and more online webinars which are easily accessible, all you need is a laptop and the access to the internet! Many creatives and entrepreneurs make free webinars where they talk about their craft and how they got started. For example Sophia Amoruso is holding a free webinar on 5 Things you need to know to start your business today this Thursday! If you’d like to sign up for the webinar click HERE.
  4. Set little goals for yourself – I love the feeling of crossing out things I did from my to do list. It gets me going and keeps me motivated. In order to be pushed forwards and not held back by your own lists make sure that what you write down is not a goal that would take weeks or months to achieve. Start small, even with a breakfast plan or morning meditation and grow from there. You need to make sure you know what to do to get to your final goal and not get demotivated by the amount of work you need to put in to get there.
  5. Treat yourself – I can’t stress this enough – happy and comfortable person equals more shit done. Don’t stress yourself, don’t overwork yourself and always put yourself and your well-being first. Make sure you know why you’re doing what you’re doing, eat that chocolate, go watch a movie, buy that book, go out with friends. Things we enjoy doing are not a distraction but a treat and sacrificing doing something that brings you joy to throw yourself into a spiral of constant work has never done any good to anyone…

Keeping yourself motivated can be a hard full time job. It is necessary to remember that we are allowed to have a day off and just… breathe!

We are now on PATREON!

MyBest, is constantly growing and we refuse to stop! Everything started with nothing but an idea to create a platform by creatives for creatives where we would not only showcase the art but also talk about daily life and day to day struggles of artists and creatives alike. Starting off in the art industry can be hard and we wanted to show other people that they’re not alone in this! Everything is a process and becoming a full-time artist can be a struggle sometimes but worry not as climbing up the career ladder is a time-consuming process in every occupation!

The very first issue of MyBest, was released during lockdown and we have been surprised with the amount of people interested in, what we thought of at the time, a project of love and passion. We are grateful for all the engagement and the constantly growing following – it is lovely to see that you want to see more of what MyBest, has to offer!

Together with our resident artists we managed to create not only a magazine but also an online platform where creators can share their thoughts, art, feelings, where we motivate and inspire. I’d like to personally thank our resident artists and resident writers – you are a truly amazing bunch and you inspire me every single day to keep going and keep our magazine growing, growing and growing! The amount of work that has been put in so far in the creation of the magazine is astonishing and I believe we can do so much more!

This month we have launched our very own Patreon Profile where you can access exclusive-MyBest, content! We are incredibly grateful to each and every single one of our readers for the ongoing support and we strive to bring you even more inspiring content each month. As now we grew to be an independent art-magazine we need your help to keep building on what we already have and evolve into even bigger collaborative platform and magazine for creators.

PATREON LINK HERE – https://www.patreon.com/mybestzine

We are also always on the look out for new resident writers and artists – if you want to become a part of what we do message us on Instagram or send an email outlining how you’d like to get involved and what you’ll bring to the magazine.

Thank you for those amazing months, we are exited to see what the future holds for us!

MyBest,

Monyca xx

Working and… working?

During the lockdown I’ve spent my free time doing what I’m truly passionate about – reading, writing, editing, I have finally started the magazine you are currently reading. A lot of good things came out of the lockdown, I have all the time in the world to simply create all day every day and do all the courses I could think of. Then the 4th of July happened and with my freshly washed uniform I went back to my day job since I don’t make enough money from commissions and the magazine at the moment is mostly a hobby that adds to my bills. I work in a chain pub in the town centre, honestly, I was really looking forward to going back to work after three months of being sat at home. However that meant that I will have less time for my creative work, which at first didn’t seem to be that obvious to me.

We have reopened almost a month ago and I haven’t submitted any of my poems to any competitions or poetry magazines. I haven’t written a single article as a ghost writer and I have not had enough time to reply to all of the emails as quickly as I used to before 4th of July. The lack of time for something that used to be my entire world for the past three months made me think that I’m doing something wrong. It made it difficult to enjoy my day job, even though I adore people I work with, they never fail to put a smile on my face and they are very supportive when I tell them about my creative work.

This is one of the issues a lot of creatives face. When we just start off in the world of creative industry it can be hard to find a job in the art world that pays you well enough to support yourself only from doing art. Apart from pursuing our passion we also need to support ourselves and yes, we won’t have that much time for being sat at home creating but with good time management one can achieve equally as much with a full time position, which pays for your bills. I’m lucky enough to be equally happy at my day job as I am as a creative – that’s a first piece of advice – find a day job that makes you want to wake up in the morning and go to work. No matter what you do for a living if it doesn’t make you happy you have to change it!

Plan your days off and days when you’ve got a late start. I don’t always have to wake up at 8am bu I do. Why? Because if I start at 3pm I still have time to do some social media marketing for the zine or reply to some emails. I have enough time to get ready, have breakfast, work on my creative projects and then go to work. Since I usually write at night if my partner isn’t home I will spend good 2 hours working on the book I’m currently writing. As long as you want to find time for your projects, trust me, you will. Go, get yourself a planner, calendar, notebook. Write down what you want to do during your day off. Make the points very specific so that you have ten tasks to do and then cross out half – amidst creative jobs and working day jobs don’t forget you also need to rest.

Take care of yourself, get those bills paid, stay safe and stay creative!

Pimp up your CV

The amount of time I’ve spent trying to create a perfect resume is… actually it’s pretty sad. I’ve been looking for the best way to put my experience, skills and education down on paper and nothing seemed to work. So I started googling, signing up of webinars and courses on writing a resume. I have put everything I found out together and within a week I came up with a couple of CVs and started sending them out. Month later I was writing my very first article for VICE Polska. Today I decided to share everything I’ve learnt with you guys.

Excitement in the room is astronomical

It’s been a long and exciting process which today has officially come to an end. Issue#1 is soon going to be available in print! We have been working alongside a bunch of talented people who helped us out during the process with editing, layout, proofreading and publishing! We will talk in more detail about the process of creating MyBest, both in columns as well as in print versions so stay tuned.

We are proud to announce that MyBest, Issue1 Beginnings goes live on our website and soon after you’ll be able to purchase a print issue of the magazine with exclusive content forom our resident artists and contributors! All of the works submitted to the first issue of the magazine were incredible, unfortunately we had to select only a few to be featured in print.

Preview of the paper Issue can be found on our Instagram @MyBestZine

You will be able to purchase paper issue of MyBest, at https://mybestzine.bigcartel.com/

Without YOU there would be no MyBest, so we’d like to thank all of you for being with us as readers, contributors, resident artists and writers. We hope to bring you more and more inspiring content in the future and we can’t wait to see more of your work.

Soon we will announce the theme for Issue2 of the magazine!

Thank you for all your support,

MyBest,

Why rejections are important for an artist?

I remember the first time when I sent one of my short stories to a magazine. The excitement was mixed with anxiety. What if they don’t publish my work? Does it mean that I’m a bad writer? Does it mean that I should abandon my dreams of ever publishing anything and look for something else, choose a different path? My grandma always wanted me to become a doctor so maybe that’s what I should do? After a rather long internal monologue I clicked submit. Immediately after I closed my laptop and continued watching videos on my phone.

Then the day when I received an answer to my submission finally came. I got rejected. The story didn’t quite fit the magazine, they were looking for something else entirely. I didn’t understand. I have put so much work into this piece, the thought of it not being good enough to be published was very disappointing. I kept on reading. They said they liked my story, however, even though it was a well written piece it didn’t give the reader the feel they were looking for for the issue. A part of me wanted to stop reading the email – what’s the point in reading it if it’s a simple no from the editing team? Let me tell you!

Every rejection is an opportunity to further improve your work. If a publication says they won’t include your work in their next issue there is always a reason behind it and usually they will tell you why it’s not the best fit for their publication. Rejection is not the end of the world, it’s a suggestion on how to improve and perhaps what to do next time to get that publication! It’s always fairly disappointing when our work gets rejected but hey, do you know how many times Stephen King got rejection letter before he got published? Exactly! It’s not a sign that you are bad at what you’re doing, it’s a sign you still have a room for improvement or that you simply didn’t read the submission guidelines careful enough and your work doesn’t fit the theme of the issue.

What are my tips? Easy:

  1. Always read the guidelines very carefully – they tell you what size/font to use, what genres they accept and what else you need to include in your submission.
  2. Don’t beg to be published – let your work speak for itself.
  3. Never send unfinished work or first drafts – take some time and put effort into the piece you want to get published. It does pay off.
  4. Don’t get discouraged, rejection is nothing else but an invitation to try again.
  5. Keep on trying till you succeed – I have received multiple rejection emails and then one sunny day I got an email from Vice inviting me to write for them! Whatever you do – never give up.
  6. Observe publications you like, read what they publish, see what they are all about and only then submit your work. If you don’t know a publication, how can you be sure what you send is the right material for them?
  7. Keep on creating!

I hope I helped you a bit and made you realize that rejections are only part of creation. Keep on creating! – Monyca